DriveThruRPG.com
Browse Categories













Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
You must be logged in to rate this
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rulebook
by Ville H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/03/2018 10:22:57

I've never read or played a Warhammer Fantasy product before.

Warhammer's world feels more "sociological" than many fantasy games': it's clearly a society with its own features, functions, and classes with wide gaps in wealth and status. No one in this world is merely an "individual", but always an individual in a society. Your character's career is always tied to a place in the society; but they still have reasons to go on adventures and the game offers suggestions. For example, there are limits to what doctors are allowed to do in schools, so some more enterprising types see adventuring as an opportunity to learn some nitty-gritties of physiology and anatomy in practice.

The rules are based on d100. I don't know what the first two editions were like, but this edition uses the same dice operations that I know from Unknown Armies: doubles/matches, reversals, and rerolls. I'm not usually a big fan of systems that use the d100, but this seems to work pretty well and utilize the mechanics to their full extent. WFRP even uses Success Levels in a pretty elegant way: only the number on the tens die matter. That is, if your need to roll at least 61 and you roll 07, your success level is 6-0 = 6. Success levels can be used pretty much everywhere and you can even deduce dramatic outcomes from them ("yes, and", "no, but" etc.)

There's not a lot of maths involved anywhere and any special abilities that your character may have are pretty easily understood - most of them are described with one or two sentences. In addition, the special abilities called Talents aren't dependent on one another - that is, you don't need to pick A in order to later pick B and C or D. If you like intricate character builds, this isn't for you. But if you appreciate pretty light system with more emphasis on story than mastering the mechanics, you might like this. The advancement system seems like the fiddliest bit of the game, but at least it's done between sessions.

There are some slight organisatory issues (Success Levels are mentioned before they're explained, for example) and the PDF isn't bookmarked. The organisatory issues only really matter on the first read-through, because once you grasp the basics, you know how everything works and it's easy to grasp the logic of the system. The lack of bookmarks is a shame, but at least the six-page index appears to be pretty useful.

Other than those, the book is well-edited. The text goes straight to the point and uses words effectively: it achieves both usefulness and color without wasting words. Probably my favorite are the pages on the main gods of the Empire: each one gets a page, but on that page, you get a lot of stuff on their beliefs, practices, symbols etc.

Like I said, I can't compare it to the earlier editions which I haven't read. As a stand-alone product, it feels reasonably old-school without the clunkiness of many old-school games. The system offers a lot of freedom to make the game suit your group; and it's gritty and non-intrusive but still supports fail forward. Overall, it successfully walks the path between old and new. It's a great product.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
by Malte R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/31/2018 03:54:10

USNA managed to fit the huge scope of 40k into a single ruleset, which is quite a feat. Their approach enables you to play characters such as underhive scum or Ork Boys up to the glorious (Cchaos) Space Marines, Inquisitors and Rogue Traders. It leaves you with a freedom of choice in regards to the play-style that is fascinating (Eldar Corsairs or Chaos Heretics, anyone? You can play as such!). The rules are comprehensive and as a GM I have never managed large quantities of NPCs quiet as streamlined. The shifting mechanic gives the players a good ammount of influence on the outcome of their actions and USNA made sure that no skill feels obsolete. The combat is gritty but rewarding (and characters can make use of non-combat skills through "Interaction attacks" which influence the fight as well and add narrative moment).

Overall I like USNA's take on the 40k Universe, that is why I did not vote 2 stars.

But the rules suffer from poor editing, that leaves you pondering. There are a lot of mechanical inconsistencies that give the impression that at one point USNA decided to further streamline the rules but failed to check all the cross references for consistency. Which in turn ruins the whole streamlined ruleset like a deep road bump on a German highway. To me as a GM whose players appreciate my fair application of the rules and who do not like arbitrary rule interpretations, this can really ruin the flow. USNA are eager to clarify those rules problems in their forum, but I would rather not have to check a forum repeatedly and keep a stack of notes next to my rule book that are not story related.

So in the end, I feel like I purchased a (late) beta product and that is not what I ordered. I'll be happy to improve my rating when the PDF gets updated, but right now I can only recommend to buy the game with caution. I have hopes that since I have a PDF it will improve in the next months as it gets updated. But if I had bought the print version in the current state of the editing I'd return it immediately.

TL;DR: The scope and the approach is rewarding. Nevertheless, the rules are poorly edited and leave the impression that this is a beta product.

EDIT 31.10.2018: Our group enjoys the rules very much and in the past weeks(!) since I've written the review USNA has taken the input of the player base very seriously. Keep it up! :) Even though the PDF has not been updated yet, I feel inclined to improve the rating.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay First Edition - Middenheim: City of Chaos
by sebastien c. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/23/2018 10:34:41

Great scan! Reminds me of my youth. Please scan more of the WFRP 1st edition!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay First Edition - Middenheim: City of Chaos
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay First Edition - Shadows Over Bögenhafen The Enemy Within Part 1
by J C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/16/2018 21:59:23

The book is missing the GM map, and Players map of Bögenhafen which should be on pg 109 & 110 but theres nothing there, with out it, the game can not really be run. This has now been fixed!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay First Edition - Shadows Over Bögenhafen The Enemy Within Part 1
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Wrath & Glory: Blessings Unheralded
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/14/2018 03:08:03

https://www.teilzeithelden.de/2018/09/12/angespielt-schellstarter-wrath-glory-ulisses-north-america-purge-the-heretics/

Nachdem bekannt wurde, dass Fantasy Flight Games nicht länger die Lizenz für Warhammer 40.000-Rollenspiele hält, war das Ende des beliebten Dark Heresy eingeläutet. Ein bisschen mussten Fans um die Zukunft bangen, bis Ulisses North America im Sommer 2017 einen Nachfolger ankündigte: Wrath & Glory. Wir haben den Quickstarter ausprobiert.

Warhammer erlebt derzeit, so könnte man sagen, einen zweiten Frühling. Mit Age of Sigmar wurde ein neues Zeitalter für Fantasy-Liebhaber eingeführt, das nach einem holprigen Start nun viele Fans hat. Die achte Edition der Warhammer 40.000-Regeln verkauft sich ebenfalls gut, und mit Shadespire, Kill Team und Adeptus Titanicus sind eine ganze Reihe Nebenlinien auf dem Markt. Darüber hinaus gibt es zahlreiche digitale Spiele und Sammelkartenspiele.

Höchste Zeit also, auch die Rollenspieler mit neuem Futter versorgen. Passend zum Reigen der vielen Neuerscheinungen hat Ulisses North America, der US-Ableger von Ulisses Spiele, mit Wrath & Glory ein brandneues System für Warhammer 40.000 vorgelegt.

Die Spielwelt Wir schreiben das 41. Jahrtausend, und zwischen den Sternen gibt es nur eines: Krieg. Seit tausenden Jahren sitzt der Imperator der Menschen langsam verwesend in seinem goldenen Thron und herrscht über Millionen von Welten und Billionen von Lebewesen. Es ist eine Zeit, in der das Versprechen von Fortschritt und Wohlstand längst im grausamen Gemetzel unzähliger Kriege und dem Lachen blutlechzender Götter untergegangen ist. Das Universum ist ein großer und böser Ort, an dem dich niemand vermissen wird.

Mit ähnlichen Einleitungsworten führt der günstige Quickstarter die Spielenden in die Welt von Warhammer 40.000 ein. Wer in der Welt bereits zu Hause ist, kennt diese Worte nur zu gut. Wer sich neu auf die unzähligen Schlachtfelder wagt, bekommt gleich den ersten Eindruck: Das Leben Einzelner ist nicht viel Wert, und das Universum ist ein schrecklicher Ort geworden. Gegen das Imperium der Menschheit wirkt das Imperium aus Star Wars geradezu wie ein humanistischer Verein.

Die Bedrohungen dieser Zukunft sind vielfältig. Anhänger der Chaos-Götter, die das Imperium in seiner jetzigen Form vernichten wollen und dabei wenig rücksichtsvoll vorgehen, verfeindete Alien-Rassen und zahlreiche, oft blutige, Intrigen, sind ständige Gefahren. Das Imperium begegnet diesen mit mannigfaltigen Institutionen, wie einem gigantischen Verwaltungs- und Militärapparat, den legendären Space Marines und der gefürchteten Inquisition. Im Quickstarter werden die Grundzüge der Welt und die wichtigsten Akteure kurz umrissen, damit man auch als Einsteiger einen groben Überblick bekommt.

Der Quickstarter beinhaltet zudem sechs vorgefertigte Charaktere, die verschiedener nicht sein könnten. Neben einer Agentin der Inquisition findet man eine imperiale Gardistin, eine imperiale Kommissarin (eine Art Polit-Offizier), einen Space Marine der White Scars, eine Sororitas-Schwester (eine Art weiblicher Paladin) und einen imperialen Priester.

Diese formen gemeinsam eine sogenannte Warband (Kriegsbande). Was diese Individuen zusammengebracht hat und warum sie abseits ihrer eigentlichen Einheiten unterwegs sind, bleibt dabei dem Spielleiter überlassen. Schwammig wird nur darauf verweisen, dass die Kriegsbande, derzeit einen Freihändler unterstützt. Der Einfachheit halber bietet sich an, aus so einem gemischten Haufen eine Inquisitions-Zelle zu machen, ähnlich wie in Dark Heresy.

Im vollständigen Regelwerk wird in dieser Hinsicht maximale Flexibilität erlaubt. Man kann sowohl eine Gruppe Inquisitions-Agenten spielen, als auch einen Trupp Space Marines, polizeiliche Ermittler oder einen Kommando-Trupp. Sogar eine Einheit Eldar (Weltraum-Elfen) oder Orks zu spielen ist möglich.

Der Zusammensetzung der Gruppe sind fast keine Grenzen gesetzt, so dass man je nach persönlicher Vorliebe spielen kann: Eher kampflastig, eher ermittelnd oder eine gute Mischung aus beidem, oder vielleicht sogar die Abenteuer von Freihändlern? Kaum ein System dürfte so viele Freiheiten bereits mit dem Grundregelwerk einräumen. Bereits im Schnellstarter zeichnet sich aber ab, dass es ähnlich wie in Dark Heresy, nicht sehr sinnvoll sein dürfte eine gemischte Truppe aus normalen Menschen und einem Space Marine zu formen. Nicht nur seine Werte, sondern auch der Status des Space Marines, verschrieben die Balance der Gruppe stark.

Erfreulich ist übrigens, dass die fertigen Charaktere bereits untereinander verknüpft sind und man als Spielerin und Spieler weiß, wie die Charaktere zueinander stehen. Darüber hinaus gibt es ein kurzes kampflastiges Abenteuer, das aber auch die Regeln abseits der Kämpfe gut verdeutlicht und der Spielergruppe etwas ermittlerisches Geschick abverlangt.

In drei Akten arbeiten sich die Spielenden durch ein Krankenhaus, in dem etwas nicht mit rechten Dingen zugeht, und bietet so einen guten Eindruck über die Spielidee hinter Wrath & Glory: klassische Detektivarbeit garniert mit regelmäßigen bewaffneten Auseinandersetzungen.

Die Regeln Die Regeln sind eine Mischung aus altbekannten und ein paar wirklich netten Ideen. Proben würfelt man stets mit einem Pool von W6, üblicherweise benötigt man drei Erfolge. Die Würfelergebnisse Vier, Fünf und Sechs stellen Erfolge dar, wobei Letzteres als zwei Erfolge zählt. Würfelt man zwei oder mehr Sechsen und hat zudem mehr Erfolge als benötigt, kann man einen Sechser-Wurf „verschieben“. Damit kann man entweder im Kampf Bonusschaden machen oder bekommt einen Vorteil in Nicht-Kampfhandlungen. Beispiel: Markus braucht drei Erfolge und würfelt eine Vier, eine Fünf und zwei Sechsen und hat somit sechs Erfolge. Bereits mit den ersten drei Würfeln hat jedoch er genug Erfolge erzielt. Er kann nun die zweite Sechs in einen Vorteil verwandeln.

Die Proben können natürlich modifiziert werden, um die Schwierigkeit der Aufgabe zu reflektieren. Wrath & Glory rechnet hier immer in Zweierschritten, von einer Erleichterung von -2 bis zu einer Erschwernis von +8.

Die Proben würfelt man dabei auf passende Fertigkeiten, und ein kombinierter Wert aus Fertigkeitswert und Attributwert ergibt den Würfelpool. Dazu kommen noch Charaktereigenschaften (Traits), die zum Beispiel etwas über den Wohlstand, die körperliche und geistige Widerstandskraft oder den Einfluss des Charakters aussagen. Diese Werte werden in entsprechenden Situationen herangezogen und entscheiden zum Beispiel darüber, ob ein Charakter im Kampf Schaden erleidet und wie stark.

Friss mein Kettenschwert, Häretiker! – Die Kampfregeln Warhammer ist von harten und brutalen Kampfregeln geprägt. Auch Wrath & Glory versucht diesem Aspekt gerecht zu werden. Relevant für den Kampf sind dabei zwei Fertigkeiten, nämlich Weapon Skill (Nahkampf) und Ballistic Skill (Fernkampf), der Defence-Wert, der Schadenswert der Waffe, sowie der Shock-Wert und die Anzahl von Wunden.

Allgemein

Die Initiative liegt immer bei den Spielern, es sei denn sie geraten in einen Hinterhalt und entdecken diesen nicht rechtzeitig. Spannend: Zu Beginn jeder Kampfrunde entscheiden die Spieler über die Reihenfolge, in der sie drankommen. Das gibt Kämpfen eine interessante Dynamik. Beginnend mit dem ersten Spieler wechseln sich dann Spieler und NSC ab. Ist in einer Situation unklar, wer beginnt, wird ein W6 geworfen, und die beteiligten Charaktere handeln in der Reihenfolge der Würfelergebnisse.

Jeder Spieler hat mehrere Aktionsmöglichkeiten pro Kampfrunde. Eine Bewegungsaktion (bestehend aus einer einfachen Bewegung und entweder Rennen oder Sprinten) und eine Kampfaktion, bis zu zwei einfache Aktionen sowie eine unbegrenzte Anzahl von freien Aktionen. Letztere dürfen auch genutzt werden, wenn ein anderer Spieler dran ist. Dazu zählt zum Beispiel ein Soak-Wurf, um eine Verwundung zu reduzieren. Einfache Aktionen sind etwa das Ziehen von Waffen oder Drücken von Schaltern.

Darüber hinaus kann man eine zusätzliche Aktion pro Runde durchführen, die dann um +2 erschwert ist. Dabei darf keinesfalls eine Aktion doppelt ausgeführt werden. Es ist also möglich, in einer Kampfrunde in Deckung zu rennen, dabei das Magazin zu wechseln und zu schießen.

Angriff

Beginnt man einen Kampf, würfelt man im Nah- oder Fernkampf gegen den Verteidigungswert des Gegners. Hat dieser zum Beispiel einen Wert von 5, benötigt der Charakter auch fünf Erfolge. Dabei ist es möglich, einen Gegner umzurennen, dem eigenen Hieb mehr Wucht zu verpassen oder sogar, für einen kumulierten +2 Malus je Gegner, mehrere Gegner gleichzeitig anzugreifen.

Außerdem sind gezielte Schüsse für eine erschwerte Probe möglich, die dann bis zu 3 Bonuswürfel auf den Schadenswert geben.

Kommt man übrigens zu dicht an einen Feind, kann man diesem nur noch im Nahkampf beikommen oder versuchen, mit einer Pistole zu agieren, wobei man aber auf Nahkampf würfeln muss. Charaktere können sich mit einer Bewegung von einem Gegner lösen, der dafür aber sofort einen Angriff würfeln darf.

Schock und Schaden

Ist die Angriffsprobe erfolgreich, geht es an das Auswürfeln das Schadens. Jede Waffe hat einen bestimmten Schadenswert, der mit einem oder mehreren W6 noch erhöht werden kann. Ist dieser Schadenswert gleich dem Widerstandswert des Charakters, entsteht zwar keine ernste Verletzung aber ein Schock, der mit einem W3 ausgewürfelt wird. Die ausgewürfelte Zahl zieht der getroffene Spieler nun vom eigenen Schockwert ab. Sinkt dieser auf 0 oder darunter, ist der Charakter erschöpft und nicht mehr zu komplizierten Handlungen fähig. Er kann sich nur noch einfach bewegen, einfache Aktionen ausführen oder sich aus einem Kampf zurückziehen.

Liegt der Schadenswert über dem Widerstandswert, erhält der Charakter pro Schaden über dem Widerstandswert eine Wunde. Fällt der Wundwert auf 0, ist der Charakter zu schwer verletzt für weitere Kämpfe und bricht zusammen. Erhält er auf diese Weise mit einem Schadenswurf die doppelt so viel Schaden, wie sein Start-Wundwert beträgt, stirbt der Charakter sofort. Dies gilt auch, falls ein Gegner einem bereits niedergeschlagenen Gegner weiteren Schaden zufügt.

Ist ein Charakter schwer verwundet, muss er in jeder Kampfrunde eine Defiance-Probe mit einem W6 absolvieren. Bei einem Erfolg stabilisiert sich sein Zustand, schlägt die Probe dreimal fehl, stirbt der Charakter ebenfalls. Alternativ können schwer verletzte Charaktere auch durch andere Charaktere mit der Fähigkeit Medicae stabilisiert werden.

Wrath & Glory & Ruin Aus vielen Systemen bekannt sind sogenannte Fate-Punkte, die zum Beispiel erlauben, einen misslungenen Wurf zu wiederholen. Wrath & Glory führt gleich drei solche Mechanismen ein, die unterschiedlich gesammelt werden können und auch unterschiedliche Auswirkungen haben.

Jeder Spieler hat zu Beginn der Spielsitzung zwei Wrath-Punkte. Für schöne Rollenspielszenen kann die Spielleiterin oder der Spielleiter Charaktere mit zusätzlichen Punkten belohnen. Außerdem dürfen alle Spielenden zu Beginn einer Spielsitzung auf ein Missionsziel würfeln. Diese Ziele geben einem zum Beispiel vor, eine Situation statt mit Gewalt mit Raffinesse zu lösen oder einen bestimmten Satz zu sagen. Eine schöne Idee, die Rollenspiel belohnen soll. Wrath-Punkte kann man ausgeben, um misslungene Proben nochmals zu würfeln, im Kampf den Schockwert zu regenieren oder ein kleines erzählerisches Element einer Spielszene zu verändern bzw. zu ergänzen. Wrath-Punkte werden nicht in die nächste Spielsitzung übertragen, und jeder startet wieder mit zwei.

Glory-Punkte hingegen sind ein Pool der Spielergruppe. Dieser hat mindestens eine Grenze von 6 und maximal eine Grenze von Spielerzahl +2. Glory-Punkte erhält man entweder, wenn man eine 6 bei einer Probe übrighat oder man mit dem Wrath-Würfel eine 6 würfelt.

Diese Punkte kann man für Bonuswürfel bei Proben nutzen, für Bonusschaden oder um die Initiative zu beeinflussen.

Mit Ruin-Punkten erhält auch die Spielleiterin oder der Spielleiter eigene Fate-Punkte. Wann immer ein Corruption- oder Fear-Test nicht bestanden wird, oder sie oder er selbst eine 6 auf seinem Wrath-Würfel würfelt, erhält die Spielleiterin oder der Spielleiter einen Ruin-Punkt. Diesen kann sie oder er für verschiedene Vorteile zu seinen Gunsten ausgeben, ähnlich wie die Spieler.

Erscheinungsbild Ernteten erste Entwürfe noch harsche Kritik, weil der Stil zu freundlich und sauber sei, sind die finalen Illustrationen durchweg gelungen und geben die Spielwelt gut wieder. Einzig der Space Marine scheint bei seinem Training auf den „Leg-Day“ verzichtet zu haben.

Das Layout ist übersichtlich und professionell, und man findet sich im Regelwerk und in den Charakteren schnell zurecht.

Fazit Wrath & Glory versucht nicht einfach, alte Warhammer 40.000-Rollenspiele zu kopieren, sondern etwas Neues zu sein. Die Möglichkeiten, an Abenteuer heranzugehen, sind dabei entsprechend umfangreich, und der Quickstarter vermittelt einen guten Eindruck. Die Regeln sind simpel, lediglich in Kämpfen könnten die zwei Schadenswerte etwas Geschwindigkeit kosten. In der Praxis ging dies nach ein paar Kämpfen aber flott von der Hand und simuliert sehr schön die Erschöpfung, die in Kämpfen auftritt. Mit Wrath, Glory und Ruin wurden zudem sehr interessante Abwandlungen der beliebten Fate-Punkte geschaffen, die die Willkür und Grausamkeit des Universums auch in den Regeln widerspiegeln. Schön ist daran auch, dass die Regeln selbst zu mehr Rollenspiel einladen. Ob jedoch die Mischung aus einfachen Menschen, göttlichen Space Marines und Aliens innerhalb einer Gruppe sinnvoll ist oder massiv das Balancing beeinflusst, muss ein umfangreicher Spieltest der vollständigen Regeln zeigen. Klar muss Spielenden auch sein: Hier gibt es keine romantisierte Guten und die Welt ist menschenverachtend. Das ist also nicht für jeden etwas, zumindest ganz sicher nicht, für eher zartbesaitete Gemüter. Wer sich aber auf diese beiden Punkte einlassen wird, lernt eine Welt kennen, die in ihrer Vielfalt und Komplexität, kaum zu überbieten ist. Selbst nach Jahren des Spielens, wird man immer wieder neue Geheimnisse lüften und interessanten Seiten der Welt entdecken.

Der Spieltest hat jedenfalls Lust auf mehr gemacht. Das englische Regelwerk ist inzwischen analog und digital samt Kampagnenband erschienen. Ulisses hat bereits angekündigt, noch im Herbst/Winter 2018 eine deutsche Übersetzung zu veröffentlichen.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Blessings Unheralded
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
by A customer [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/12/2018 08:54:02

A very decent d6 pool system that is simple enough to start in but has enough complexity to justify sinking your teeth into. A lot of variety on player characters, and a lot of power to the GM to alter things on the fly with game mechanics (Ruin and Wrath). Many mechanics are simplified and left to the GM's discretion, like purchasing items or bionics. Although these can be aquired by players with BP (Build Points, which is used to buy attributes for example) at a higher cost so DM's that don't want to deal with making up rules can always default to that.

Not everything is good though. It's missing some editing problems. Influence used to aquireitems and using wealth has two rules as to how said wealth is spent (before or after check, which makes a pretty big difference). The way suppression fire works with one rule stating you can reduce the DN (Difficulty Number or DC) of the check by the weapon's Salvo rating, while other saying you can spend reloads up to Salvo times. Interaction Attacks, a way for RP characters to feel useful in combat are also poorly written as the DN for their checks are absurdly high on anything except the most basic of enemies, unless rolled. I think they wanted the checks to be Opposed, which would be balanced but as written the DN's are almost impossible.

The book could also use some structuring formatting as quite a bit of information is repeated and to create a character you have to swap around the book quite a bit.

Still looking forward to the future, I still think this is a great product, but does need a little iron out. As a DM I really like the freedom I get and almost all the problems can be fixed with a bit DM ruling. Can't wait to see expansions add new enemies and archetypes.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Wrath & Glory: Dark Tides
by Nathanial T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/29/2018 20:38:48

A servicable first encounter with the world of Warhammer 40,000. If your players are neophytes to the setting, this adventure path is a good way to get their feet wet (ha ha) with the universe and the lore without making them read twenty years of codexes. At the same time, for an investigative adventure it felt very linear and almost railroaded at times. Someone expecting the chance to run their own investigation is going to be disappointed at the presentation of this adventure. I'm hoping for better from Ulisses Spiele in the future, but I can't recommend picking this one up unless you really feel the need to grab all the new Wrath & Glory products.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Dark Tides
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rulebook
by Rory H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/26/2018 19:42:50

As with other Cubicle 7 products, the layout and general presentation are top notch and it's pretty well written and easy to follow. The rules are very much based on WFRP 1st edition, rather than 3rd or 2nd. We all expected that the experimental 3rd edition rules to be thrown out, but some fans of 2nd edition will note that there are more rules stipulations and a few changes from what they might expect. That said, character generation was fun when we tried it, and the rules have a gritty flavour which is key to the setting. The real value of the new game is likely to become more apparent in the supplements and campaigns to follow (especially The Enemy Within redux). It's a professional product, but it still needs a bit more to bring it alive.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rulebook
by A customer [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/26/2018 12:20:47

Good rules but the wording and imagery has too much influence from AoS and generic dark fantasy tropes rather than the unique and interesting cultural aspects of the setting and its civilizations. I would recommend buying this on sale and mining it for good rules additions to second edition WFRP.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
by Robert C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/25/2018 14:39:57

I have played the FFG 40k games (Only War and after) extensively and I would say that overall, Wrath and Glory is a much needed improvement, however I will break down into specifics as to what I found good about the relase, and what I found bad.

PROS

  • System is more intuitive It's been much easier to explain to new players that you make a die pool, pick the successful die, and do cool stuff with the shifted die than it is to explain why it's a +10 this time but a +20 this other time, and how their talent plays into the situation. Also the biggest thing is the removal of the dodge skill, opting to instead give defense skills and items a bonus to a passive stat, or straight damage mitigation. It helps keep combat flowing as opposed to rolling to hit, then rolling to dodge, then counting out how many degrees of success, and on and on.

  • The depth is still there A lot of people complain that there is a loss of complexity given the expansion of the type of characters and themes that are covered in the system. (40k as a whole instead of just inquisitors, or rogue traders, etc etc). I would support this in the realm of fluff, but when it comes to player decisions effective combat scenarios, I think the system does it well in spades. You have plenty of combat actions that change your odds depending on positioning, movement, aiming, and terrain just like the previous iteration, along with new mechanics like interaction attacks and meta-resource management (wrath, glory, and ruin) that give players more control over how they respond to a scenario. The game is also less reliant on randomization, given the nature of dice pools, and damage is a fixed value with the oppertunity to add a more, as opposed to the old system of your lasgun can do anywhere from 3 to 12 damage.

  • Tons of options It always irked me that the FFG 40k systems provided very limited frameworks for playing xeno characters. Rogue Trader and Dark Heresy alone would give tons of oppertunities for players to be a xenos, but nothing ever came of it save an the old rogue trader guides. I like that right off the bat, you get a couple options for xenos and a framework on how they could be included in a campaign. It's personal preference, but I would rather have a game with a solid base game, with as many options and variants that are fleshed out in future splatbooks, than a game that focuses on a few specific things.

  • Less restrictive character building The biggest improvement, in my opinion, is the reduction of mechanics that focus on system mastery over player vision. FFG's Only War gameline introduced a concept called aptitudes, where specific character creation options would give you discounts to purchasing attributes, skills, and talents provided you met the criteria. While an interesting concept in theory, it ultimately resulted in players HAVING to choose some very specific backgrounds and classes in order to get the character to do what they want. This would lead to some very frustrating moments, such as a Master of Ordinance being very bad at actually calling in artillery strikes, or Commissars who could fight in combat without massive xp dumps. Archetypes offer interesting abilities that are unique, but at the same time, removing the old aptitude system has freed up players to build their characters the way they want to, without punishing them for playing outside the lines.

  • Tiers and ranks Tiers and ranks are a solid concept in gauging the scope and power-levels you want your players to be in, without resorting to xp adjustement. I think it's helpful to have the game advise you on what sort of missions, specific archetypes would most likely embark on.

CONS

  • Character creation error This is my biggest complaint and most frustrating issue with the book, and that is that there are several, important instances of rules inconsistencies in the book. The biggest one is between the Tier Character Creation Restrictions (Table 3-1) being completely inconsistent with the specific aptitude, talent, and special abilities restrictions on their respective sections. You will have no choice but to make an executive decision as a GM on which of the tables will be the one you go with (I personally went with the section specific tables). You also have issues that come up when making Ascended characters, in that if you run a game that stretches through multiple tiers, there is really no set up on how to ascend your character multiple times. (I personally just allow the player to respec and write it off as there was a long inbetween the increase of tiers). You may argue that the games were not intended to be played through multiple tiers, but if you look at their Dark Tides module, it does state you have the option of playing through the entire thing as the characters from the first story to the last.

  • Bland Talents Most the talents revolve around 'get x amount of die equal to your rank or 1/2 rank, in relation to doing thing'. I think it's a little too cookie cutter and not very interesting. With that being said, you have some interesting talents such as Fearless, Bombadier, and Devotees. I hope future books will inject some talents that allow players to do what they normally can't. Also, I think it's a little strange that talents, being so dependent on rank, will lead to strange situations where the same character at tier 1 rank 5, will recieve more bonus die than tier 3 rank 1. While die bonuses are limited by tier level, it still doesn't make sense to me thematically or mechanically (why or how could a higher tier character get less die than a lower tier character)

  • More Archetypes This gripe is a time-sensitive one, I'm sure that this will fade as more splats focusing on specific segments of the setting come out. While I appreciate the wide variety of options to play with, I did wish that there were more specific archetypes for given factions. Whether it was stormboys and eldar exiles, or even imperial guard medic vs ministorum doctor vs hospitaller vs space marine apothecary, giving different variants to all the factions would have made the game feel more fleshed out. Again, I will first hand admit this is a core rulebook, and it's more than reasonable to suggest that future books will cover this problem.

SUMMARY If they just fix the first issue listed I would upgrade my rating to a 4/5 instantly. All in all, I have great expectations for this series, and Ross has really exceeded expectations from a doubter like me.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
by Anthony D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/22/2018 20:01:23

You can find my full review of the game here. I gave it a 3.5/5 rating with full details within the review.

For an abbreviated version of that review:

Wrath and Glory is a much welcome addition to the Warhammer RPG line. This new version is a cleaner, user friendly, and much more approachable version of the RPG when compared to the previous line by Fantasy Flight Games.

This book succeeds in many ways that others did not. The mechanic is quick to pick up and easy to hack, using a simple d6 dice pool mechanic. Fans of the miniatures will be right at home here, while roleplayers will have both easy mechanics and a handful of narrative mechanics to utilize to make the game interesting. The game also utilizes a relatively simple point-buy mechanic for building and progressing your characters (although the tables can get a bit much), and the "level" mechanic is more of a guideline of power and less a hard cap.

Wrath and Glory also makes the setting much more approachable; we are given bite-sized bits of lore to get started, which are just enough to draw conclusions but not so lacking that you feel like you need to read thirty years of lore to play.

I'm also a huge fan of using the Imperium Nihilus as a setting. One of the most frustrating parts of the 40k Universe was the hard limit of not allowing different races to cross, and the setting for this game actually promotes it. You can have a game with a Space Marine Scout, an Ork Kommando, a Tempustus Scion, and an Eldar Corsair all working for a Rogue Trader, and not only is it promoted, but it's fitting for the setting.

Sadly, the game has it's failings. Outside of some concerns I have about layout and editing, I do think the game has some mechanical issues. Namely, Wrath and Glory hasn't decided what it wants to be. One set of rules makes the game feel like a theater of mind RPG with a heavy emphasis on utilizing of story elements, but a related rule that is necessary for this works best with a battle map and miniatures (in this example: grenades and splash damage). There are also a few point in this book that a resource that should be completely optional (the Wrath Deck) becomes a mandatory element: "Threatening Tasks" (extended actions) requires the use of the Wrath Deck, and it is one of the rules that doesn't have a sidebar or alternative.

Overall, Wrath and Glory is a fun, fast-paced, and most importantly, accessible entry into the Warhammer 40k universe. It has everything you need to get started, but the game itself seems like it rides a line between a miniatures game with RPG elements, or an RPG with nods to miniature elements, and hasn't decided which way it will go. There are some things that are still missing, like more ships, specialized Astartes (no Librarians, Chaplains, or Apothecaries by the RAW), stats for Tau and Necrons, and a number of other things, but it is a good start to a game line.

I gave it a 3.5/5, as it has a number of good things going for it, even though there is an identity crisis going on.

If you're a fan of the 40k Universe, like easy to grok and hack RPG mechanics, and have a ton of Warhammer miniatures you want to repurpose, then you really can't go wrong with Wrath and Glory. The game has a ton of potential that I hope it will live up to.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - Oaths of the Riddermark
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/22/2018 07:02:12

https://www.teilzeithelden.de/2018/08/17/rezension-the-one-ring-oaths-of-the-riddermark-auf-reiter-thengels/

Lange Zeit hat in der Riddermark der gierige König Fengel regiert und mit seiner Politik das Königreich uneins gemacht. Nun ist ihm sein Sohn Thengel auf den Thron gefolgt. Der muss nicht nur den Angriffen von Dunländern und Orks begegnen, sondern auch eine Fehde zwischen seinen wichtigsten Heerführer schlichten.

Für jedes Quellenbuch für das Mittelerde-Rollenspiel The One Ring des Verlags Cubicle 7 erscheint später ein Abenteuerband. Oaths of the Riddermark ist der entsprechende Band zu Horse-lords of Rohan. Der Quellenband erschien bereits Anfang 2016, die Wartezeit war also relativ lang. Nun aber gibt es endlich sechs Abenteuer um das tapfere Reitervolk der Rohirrim und ihr Land zu erleben. Dabei dreht es sich insgesamt darum, das zerrissene Land, das unter dem Streit zwischen dem Herrscher der Westfold und dem Herrn der Eastfold leidet, für den König wieder zu einigen.

Für diese Rezension lag die PDF-Version vor.

Inhalt Vor den Abenteuern gibt es eine kleine Einführung, die ein paar grundsätzliche Informationen vermittelt. So erfährt man, dass alle Abenteuer nach dem Jahr 2955 des Dritten Zeitalters spielen, ohne dass einzelne Jahre streng festgelegt werden müssten. Vor den Abenteuern selbst stehen aber genauere Vorschläge. Generell gibt es viele Tipps, wie man die einzelnen Szenarien, die auch alleinstehend verwendet werden können, zu einer Kampagne verbinden kann. Diese findet man im Anschluss, gefolgt von einem Anhang, der vor allem vorgefertigte Charaktere enthält.

Im Dienste der Mark – Die Abenteuer Ab hier folgen Spoiler, weshalb nur potenzielle SpielleiterInnen diesen Teil lesen sollten.

[spoiler]

Blood in the Snow Blood in the Snow ist als Einführungsabenteuer gedacht. Es beginnt mit der Ankunft der Gefährten in Edoras, wo sie gleich feststellen, dass alles, was Waffen trägt, sehr geschäftig ist. Ihren Auftrag erhalten sie mit zwei anderen Gruppen direkt vom Reeve (dt. Vogt) des Königs. Sie sollen Gehöfte untersuchen, auf denen Menschen und Pferde getötet wurden. Ihre Aufgabe führt die Gefährten an den Fuß der White Mountains. Dort untersuchen sie zwei zerstörte Höfe und finden ein Opfer der Angriffe, das ihnen gerade noch sagen kann, dass eine schreckliche Bestie dahintersteckt. Sie folgen dem Hinweis in die Berge, wo sie zunächst auf eine Gruppe Dunlendings (dt. Dunländer) treffen, die ihnen Verbündete sein können. Anschließend geht es daran, die Bestie, einen Snow-Troll, zu erledigen. Dabei taucht eine der anderen Gruppen auf, nur damit ihr Anführer ein grausiges Ende findet.

Dieses Abenteuer ist fast ein Totalausfall. Dass es extrem geradlinig ist, gehört dazu. Es gibt quasi keinen Grund für die Gruppe, von der vorgegebenen Struktur abzuweichen. Besonders schwach ist der „Ermittlungsteil“ bei den Höfen. Beim ersten Hof gibt es nichts zu entdecken, was die Gruppe weiterführt, dabei hat man sogar eine Karte des Hofs abgedruckt. Und beim zweiten wartet dann ein tödlich Verwundeter, der dort nur liegt, um mit seinem letzten Atemzug zu sagen, was los ist und wo es jetzt langgeht. Ähnlich unlogisch ist die Begegnung mit den Dunlendings, die ebenfalls nur auf die Gefährten gewartet zu haben scheinen, und das, obwohl sie die Bestie selbst jagen. Merkwürdigerweise lagern sie seit mehreren Tagen am einzig möglichen Weg für den Troll, doch muss der eigentlich währenddessen dort durchgezogen sein.

Auch die anderen Gruppen, die mit dem gleichen Ziel losgeschickt wurden, sind wirklich überflüssig. Die eine taucht gar nicht mehr auf, die andere ploppt am Ende auf, nur um sich blödsinnig zu verhalten. Auch wird das vorbestimmte Ende ihres Anführers sicher bei keiner Gruppe so umzusetzen sein, schlicht weil die SC vorher reagieren würden. Und das sind leider nicht alle Punkte, die unstimmig sind.

Red Day Rising Zu Beginn von Red Day Rising befinden sich die Gefährten an der Tafel König Thengels, wo sie nach einer Diskussion über Tugenden vom Königspaar zu Boten ernannt werden. Sie sollen dabei helfen, die Fehde des Second Marshal Éogar mit dem Third Marshal Cenric durch eine politische Hochzeit zu beenden. Sie können die beiden Marshals in beliebiger Reihenfolge aufsuchen. Auf dem Weg nach Osten zu Cenric gilt es, einen Streit zwischen Anhängern der Konkurrenten zu schlichten. Am Camp des Third Marshal angekommen, bricht ein Sturm los, der die Rinderherden dort in Panik versetzt und eine Stampede auslöst. Erst anschließend treffen die Gefährten den Marshal und Esmund, also denjenigen, der heiraten soll. Die Braut, die Schildmaid Mildryd, verweilt bei ihrem Herrn Éogar. Dessen Frau wurde von Dunlendings entführt, und so sie nicht gerettet wird, ist an eine Hochzeit nicht zu denken. An Ende können die Gefährten hoffentlich Esmund und Mildryd an der Entwade vereinen.

Der Anfang ist zwar gut ausgebaut, wirkt allerdings auch aufgesetzt. Auch wird vorausgesetzt, dass Thengel die Gefährten nicht nur schon kennt, sondern auch Vertrauen zu ihnen hat. Grundsätzlich basiert dieses Abenteuer auf Begegnungen, alle gut beschrieben, mit verschiedenen NSC. Das ist eine Abwechslung zu normalen Abenteuern, man sollte aber als SpielleiterIn vorsichtig sein, damit es nicht ermüdend wird. Dafür haben es die beiden anderen Aufgaben, die Stampede und die Rettung der Frau des Marshals, in sich. Beide sind sehr gefährlich für die Gefährten. Es besteht durchaus die Möglichkeit, dass die Mission insgesamt scheitert. Insgesamt ein gelungenes Diplomatie-Abenteuer.

Wrath of the Riders In Wrath of the Riders verlangt der König vom Second Marshal Éogar zu dessen Unmut, mit den Dunlendings Frieden zu schließen. Als Botschafter hat Éogar die Gefährten auserkoren. Auf ihrem Weg ins Red Moor stellen sie fest, dass auch das Volk der Rohirrim gespalten darüber ist, ob man Frieden mit den Dunlendings schließen soll. Bald erfahren sie, dass die einfachen Dunlendings unter den Kämpfen leiden und noch dazu von Orks geplagt werden. Nach einem langen Weg durch das Red Moor erreichen die Gefährten Trefa, das Hauptdorf des Iron-folk-Stammes, wo sie nach zusätzlichen Prüfungen mit dem Häuptling sprechen können. Doch nicht nur der hat etwas dabei zu sagen, sondern auch die Barrow-witch, eine weise Frau, die in einer Prophezeiung verkündet, dass die Gefährten Unheil vom Stamm abwenden können. Willigen sie ein, was ihre Verhandlungsposition enorm stärkt, dann werden sie auf eine Queste geschickt, um einen bösartigen Pferdegeist zu erschlagen, der die Iron-folk schon lange plagt.

Dieses Abenteuer ist wirklich gut konstruiert, wieder mal bis auf den Einstieg. Es ist sehr stimmungsvoll und voller Abwechslung, genau wie man es sich wünscht. Besonders gut gefällt mir, dass die Dunlendings hier greifbar beschrieben werden, auch wenn der Iron-folk-Stamm schon etwas speziell ist. Wieder werden die SC nicht geschont und es gibt ausreichend Möglichkeiten, wie ein unvorsichtiger Rohirrim bei seinen Ahnen landet. Interessanter wird das Abenteuer noch dadurch, dass Elemente aus dem Vorangegangenen aufgegriffen werden. Leider werden nicht alle Anknüpfungspunkte in späteren Abenteuern genutzt.

Black Horses, Black Deeds Diesmal ist es Marshal Cenric, der die Gefährten in Black Horses, Black Deeds auf eine Mission schickt. Während er selbst sich um einfallende Orks kümmert, sollen sie Banditen zur Strecke bringen, die mordend und pferderaubend durch seine Länder ziehen. Ihr Weg führt sie zuerst ins Dorf Stotfold, wo sie den „Überlebenden“ eines Überfalls, Berevir, befragen können. Diese etwas fragwürdige Gestalt war, was die Gefährten jetzt schon herausfinden können, der alte Anführer der Banditen, der nun Buße für seine Verbrechen tun will. Folgen sie seinen Hinweisen, mit oder ohne seine Begleitung, dann finden sie ein Hügelgrab, in dem ein Bandit, der versucht hat, es zu plündern, vor dem rachsüchtigen Geist eines Pferdeherren gerettet werden muss. Wenig später treffen sie auf zwei von Cenrics Spähern, die Hilfe dabei brauchen, finstere Händler im Dienst des Feindes auszuschalten, die die gestohlenen Pferde bei sich haben. Nachdem sie auf dem Weg weitere Späher aus einem Hinterhalt gerettet haben, finden die Gefährten letztlich das Lager der Banditen, einen alten Turm. Dort kommt es zum Finale, und der neue Anführer der Banditen muss geschnappt werden. Zum Schluss gilt es, zurück am Hof des Königs, über Berevirs Schicksal zu entscheiden.

Im Grunde ist dieses Szenario eine lange Verfolgung von Banditen, bei der immer wieder damit zusammenhängende Ereignisse stattfinden. Der Verlauf ist dabei nicht besonders originell, funktioniert aber. Die Szene mit dem Geist im Hügelgrab wirkt leider wie ausschließlich um der Abwechslung Willen eingebaut und hat mit der eigentlichen Handlung nichts zu tun. Die Begegnung mit den Händlern des Feindes ist auch nicht besonders gut dargestellt. Kampf wird als einzige Option geliefert, obwohl gerade hier Diplomatie spannend wäre. Insgesamt überzeugt Black Horses, Black Deeds weniger.

Below the Last Mountain Zu Beginn von Below the Last Mountain treffen sich Éogar und Cenric endlich in der Westfold, um auf Befehl des Königs ihre Fehde zu beenden. Doch die Situation wird unterbrochen, als eine Reiterin von Dunlendings berichtet, die in großer Zahl ins Land kommen. Als neutrale Partei werden die Gefährten losgeschickt, um mit Männern beider Anführer die Eindringlinge zu beobachten. Schnell stellt sich heraus, dass die Dunlendings Flüchtende sind, keine Plünderer. Orks haben sie vertrieben und Sklaven genommen. Die Gefährten müssen diese Gefahr beseitigen, gleichzeitig aber darauf achten, dass die Reiter auf dem Weg keine Dunlendings abschlachten. Nach einer harten Verfolgung durch die Berge, die einige Ablenkungen und Schwierigkeiten bietet, kann die Gruppe die Orks einholen. Nach einem harten Kampf sind die Sklaven hoffentlich befreit. Nicht nur die Gruppe der Gefährten hat diese Orks verfolgt, sondern auch einige Krieger der Wulflings, ein Volk mit Blut von Rohirrim und Dunlendings in seinen Adern. Diese können zu Feind oder Freund werden. Doch gab es nicht nur eine Gruppe Orks. Eine zweite, weit größere ist auf dem Weg zu den Gefährten, und es heißt sich ihnen entgegenzustellen oder mit den Befreiten zu fliehen.

Wie im vorherigen Szenario geht es hier um die Verfolgung von Feinden. Doch Below the Last Mountain macht es meiner Meinung nach deutlich besser. Die Begegnungen auf dem Weg wirken organischer, die ganze Mission wichtiger, und generell kommt mehr Spannung auf. Gut gefällt auch, dass der Anfang auf vergangene Entscheidungen eingeht, auch wenn dies keine großen Auswirkungen hat. Und die Taten in diesem Szenario beeinflussen die Vorgänge der Zukunft.

The Woes of Winter Zu guter Letzt soll in The Woes of Winter endlich die Hochzeit von Mildryd und Esmund in Edoras stattfinden und damit die Fehde der Marshals endgültig beendigt werden. Als mittlerweile Vertraute des Königs sollen die Gefährten in der Stadt dafür sorgen, dass sich die Parteien im Vorfeld nicht an die Gurgel gehen. Keine leichte Aufgabe, zumal ein Mord geschieht und auch das Pferd der Braut durch Betrunkene zu Tode kommt. Als die Nachricht einer einfallenden Horde aus Orks und Dunlendings Edoras erreicht, müssen die Gefährten mit dem König ein weiteres Mal die Marshals zur Ordnung rufen. Mit den Gefährten, die hoffentlich viele Verbündete gesammelt haben, kommt es zu einer entscheidenden Schlacht gegen einen mächtigen Orkhäuptling, die das Schicksal der Mark über Jahre prägen wird.

Das Finale bietet einiges an Abwechslung, da es sich im ersten Teil mit der Hochzeit beschäftigt, bis dann unerwartet eine große Gefahr auftaucht. Beides ist gut beschrieben und unterscheidet sich deutlich von den anderen Abenteuern in diesem Band. Wenn gut umgesetzt, kann es wirklich ein krönender Abschluss dieser Kampagne sein.

[/spoiler]

Der Anhang Als Anhang gibt es eine einseitige Übersicht mit NSC, die in den einzelnen Abenteuern vorkommen. Durchaus praktisch.

Den größeren Teil bilden sechs vorgefertigte Charaktere, drei weibliche und drei männliche, die direkt für die Abenteuer verwendet werden können. Es sind allesamt Rohirrim, wie für die Kampagne empfohlen, die aber deutlich unterscheidbar sind und alle illustriert wurden.

Erscheinungsbild Am Layout der TOR-Publikationen gab es bisher kaum etwas zu beanstanden, und das ändert sich auch hier nicht. Der zweispaltige Text ist gut lesbar und wird immer wieder durch Textkästen oder Illustrationen aufgelockert. Letztere sind ganz ausgezeichnet und unterstreichen die Abenteuer gut. Gerade die Bleistiftzeichnungen, die es für NSC gibt, gefallen mir sehr. Im PDF laden die Seiten zügig, wenn man den Zoom nicht zu groß einstellt.

Bonus/Downloadcontent In der PDF-Version sind die Karten, die sich normalerweise im Einband befinden, gesondert als PDF beigefügt. Eine davon zeigt die Wege, die die Gefährten in den Szenarios mutmaßlich nehmen werden.

Fazit Wie macht sich der Band Oaths of the Riddermark insgesamt? Ganz gut, finde ich! Nur eines der Abenteuer muss man als Totalausfall bezeichnen: An Blood in the Snow stimmt fast nichts. Nachdem ich den Band zu Ende gelesen habe, ist mir allerdings klar, dass dieses Szenario ein reiner Lückenbüßer ist. Es sollte wahrscheinlich die Seitenzahl erhöhen, wird aber in keinem anderen Abenteuer referenziert. Der Rest ist mindestens solide, meistens aber sehr gelungen. Gerade Wrath of the Riders ist wirklich toll. Ein Szenario, das ich unbedingt einmal spielen möchte!

Meiner Meinung nach entfalten Abenteuer ihre Wirkung erst, wenn man sie als Kampagne spielt. Dazu hätte man sich bessere, direktere Verknüpfungen gewünscht, aber eine halbwegs erfahrene SpielleiterIn wird da keine wirklichen Probleme haben.

Letztlich ist dieser Band für alle etwas, die erstens Rohan-Fans sind und zweitens Abenteuer mit hohem Politik- und Diplomatieanteil mögen. Wer sich darin wiederfindet, kann auch bei dem recht hohen Preis zugreifen. Eine Kampagne von der Wirkungsmacht eines The Darkening of Mirkwood ist es nicht, aber das Hauptthema, die Beendigung der Fehde zwischen dem Second Marshal Éogar und dem Third Marshal Cenric, wird gut abgehandelt.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - Oaths of the Riddermark
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
by Gordon Q. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/19/2018 19:29:43

Fantastic book and ruleset. It's great to have a core rulebook that lets you roleplay any scenario you want in the WARHAMMER 40,000 setting. :)



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rulebook
by Mathew S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/17/2018 14:16:16

Whilst only having a preview copy like everyone else, I can only go by what is in front of me right now, and I will add more after getting my paws on the final product.

Just going to go with the Pros right now as I see them, because, as I said, only looking at a preview at the moment... Cons, if they come, will come later.

  1. I love the full page careers
  2. I like the extra XP that can be earned by taking what fate hands you
  3. I like the random race table, as I feel that non-human / demi-human races should be a rarity, and that the min-maxing nature of many games has left humans as a less than desirable choice for a lot of players
  4. I like the lethality that ranged weapons bring, which is as it should be, and that I think only one career, Roadwarden, starts with a ranged weapon out of the gate (I may be wrong, but I'm sure I couldn't find any other career that had a ranged weapon at Tier 1)
  5. I like how fast chargen is, despite how many factors are involved. I've rolled a LOT of characters so far (even run... & played in... a couple sessions!)
  6. I really love the fact that between adventures, players who haven't chosen to do certain money related activities start the next adventure broke, which adds a nice bit of motivation hehe
  7. I love that combat is still lethal, as I was genuinely worried that in this age of mostly, well, not so lethal games, that WFRP would go down that dark path too
  8. I like how straightforward progression is, despite being more linear than 1e for example, you can still go off at a tangent and it not be a chore
  9. I really like the art, the feel, and the atmosphere of the book, as I love The Old World, and have done for over 30 years
  10. I like how the different types of magic actually feel different, and how they work differently too
  11. I like how it all runs with just 2d10
  12. Finally, I like that the book has a little bit of everything and that you can run something right out of it.

(These are just my opinions and impressions. Not a professional reviewer, just an old grognard with almost 40 years of gaming under my belt, who knows what he likes and what he doesn't.)



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay First Edition Core Rulebook
by Jean-Paul T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/31/2018 14:17:43

The Warhammer FRP shines when it comes to adventures in a dangerous place where the characters clearly don't feel like overpowered heroes. This e-book is a very high quality scan, fully bookmarked and cleaned. The definitive edition for any perilous adventurers that may want to venture into a grim world.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay First Edition Core Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Displaying 166 to 180 (of 761 reviews) Result Pages: [<< Prev]  ... 10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates