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Cthulhu Britannica London: The Journal of Neve Selcibuc

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Cthulhu Britannica London: The Journal of Neve Selcibuc
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Cthulhu Britannica London: The Journal of Neve Selcibuc
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 12/30/2017 10:19:45

Presented as the journal of one Neve Selcibuc, a young journalist, this serves double purpose as a piece of Mythos fiction and - more excitingly - a mammoth in-character resource that Keepers running The Curse of Nineveh campaign can had to the players as background and indeed clues.

The tale Neve has to tell is quite dramatic beginning with someone leaping off a passenger ship to their (presumed) death leaving a small but ancient artefact, and various alarms and excursions that follow as she visits an English country house then spends time in London, with deaths and a kidnapping or two and some unexplained fires. There's even a gunfight! Stirring stuff, as the Mythos disturbs 1920s Britain. It all ties in well with the content of The Curse of Nineveh, and opportunity is provided in that work's text for this volume to appear should you have it to hand, as Neve Selcibuc features as an NPC.

It's nicely-presented, and the writing has a certain gentle charm, highlighted by line drawings that complement the text. As an in-game resource, it enhances the information available in the campaign but may prove rather too much for players to want to deal with during actual play - it may be preferable for you lend it to them to read between sessions. To help you use it to best effect, there are some notes at the back with suggestions as to the role it can play in your game. The particularly interesting thing is that only the last few pages tie in to the actual plot of The Curse of Nineveh, yet there's a whole raft of other peculiar events which could be used to develop a plot of your own, to run in parallel with the main campaign or at another time as you prefer.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Cthulhu Britannica London: The Journal of Neve Selcibuc
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Louis C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/03/2017 17:11:59

I really wanted to like this and when I first bought it I was really excited by it. Having read through it I didn't think it was as good as the Reginald Campbell Thompson one but gave it to my players at the appropriate time in the first session. They fell on it with gusto, read it cover to cover, took notes and scoured it for clues but unfortunately that's where it all went wrong. There is little in here that offers any insights into Neve and her situation but there are so many red herrings that it took me at least seven sessions before my players didn't waste half their time looking for stuff that wasn't there. It made the first chapter of Curse of Nineveh drag really hard as everything that really excited them turned out to be a blind alley and what was actually in the scenario seem a little drab (which isn't the case).

Aside from deep one investigations in Scotland and the like there were three things that I found really difficult to deal with

Archie Glossop in the scenario is painted as a studious scholar with a wife and family. In the journal he is a man about town who spends his evenings out with his friends romancing Neve. While the two don't absolutely have to be incompatible you can't help but feel that the author of the journal didn't have the same character in mind as Mike Mason did when he wrote the scenario. Certainly my characters lacked any sympathy for Archie (and had less for Bingo and Honoria) when they viewed his lifestyle trying to reconcile both sources.

The journal brings Albright right into the players line of sight as a magician of some power rather than just a genuinely unpleasant man. My players were obsessed in getting everything that Albright knew about the mythos, the deep ones and the 1919 dig. While it was fun again it just played against the flow of the adventure and I couldn't blame them because by giving them the journal I'd pointed a huge neon sign at it.

As a document to start a group off looking for deep ones in Scotland it's great and it is really very pretty but as a fairly expensive player handout for Curse of Nineveh I found it derailed the flow without really adding much to the game.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
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