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Wrath & Glory: Core Rules $29.99
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Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
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Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Nathan W. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/21/2021 22:30:11

Wrath and glory is awesome and I had a great time playing it with friends! it was one of my first times being a game master and it was just fine!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by James P. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/09/2021 10:17:07

The Cubicle 7 version of this system is amazing fun. For those who have a really deep understanding of the 40k universe and want a full on "GrimDark" adventure I can honestly say this is the best RPG you could pick up. The handling of power levels is really well done and although it does require your players to form a party that makes sense within the lore, if you are all on the same page it works great. My players have been loving it. We're playing the first mission of the new Litanies of The Lost campaign book - Damn it's dark and god Damn it's an amazing 40k experience!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Th G. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 12/23/2020 05:26:12

As a veteran 40k -er and 40k RPG GM, If I had to describe my experience of Wrath and Glory with a single word, that word would be; Disappointing

My first impression was not particularly positive - Starships slower than aircraft, and with shorter ranges than artillery was an interesting choice - that flew in the face of all lore.

They have reworked it substantially, and removed starships. So here are my thoughts on the second release.

First: Much content, barring the new setting content, is verbatim from the other 40k rpgs - psychic powers, perils of the warp, descriptions, etc.

Second: It covers pretty much everything, very thinly. It also, in my opinion, sacrifices much of the quintessential 40k character in the process.

Third: The rules. It is not a bad ruleset. It is slightly more complex than the base d100 ruleset used in the other RPG’s - featuring dicepools, and is d6 based. This makes the probabilities harder to estimate, than the other system. Overall impression of the rules and running the game, is that if you told me this was a reskinned FATE/Shadowrun with a few 40k tables, I would believe you. The biggest problem for me is that it is NOT compatible with the previous 90+ books of 40k RPG content. Suffice to say I have little reason - or way - to incorporate this into my ongoing campaign.

So, Pros:

  • Good if you have a lot of d6’s
  • Covers a lot in a small space
  • Good for quick, simple campaigns
  • Has some new setting content

Cons:

  • incompatible with the other 40k RPG systems (why???)
  • ...despite reusing much of the content, verbatim in some cases, bringing little new to the table
  • Shallow: would not recommend for extended campaigns

Final comments: I purchased this so you do not have to. The other 40k RPG’s are far more atmospheric and content rich, even comparing Rulebook for Rulebook - rather than comparing the entire series, which would be unfair. W&G brings little new to the table barring a new rulesystem, and does not really build on previous 40k RPG success by dint of incompatibility. If this was published in a world with no 40k rpgs, and purely in comparison to other RPG systems, I would award this a solid 4 stars. In light of the existence of the other 40k RPG’s, it is not favourably comparible. Supporters may point to community content for W&G, but more often than not, this is simply converted content from the other RPG’s. Some others may suggest that W&G is also more flexible and adaptible, and simpler than the other system, but this is simply not the case - the core rules are of similar complexity. As such, W&G is deserving of 2 stars at the moment.

Should there be a substantial offering vis compatibility, and a greater focus on setting, atmosphere, and so on, this has the potential to be a decent addition.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Lane T. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 09/15/2020 06:50:43

Wrath & Glory had a rough start with its previous publisher, but I've been playing since its earliest released edition. It is at its heart, a system that accomplishes what it sets out to accomplish and has ample room for growth.

To wit: W&G is not meant to be a 1:1 replacement for its predecessor system, Dark Heresy (and its derivatives like Rogue Trader, Only War, Deathwatch). Dark Heresy was by design, intended to be an extraordinarily deep system, with little breadth. It is deep, but narrow. It is focused almost entirely on Imperium-based play, with incredibly rich descriptions of equipment and minor settings, and superlatively detailed rules for every occasion. That was both its greatest quality, and worst trait in my opinion. Every time I picked up a Dark-Heresy style sourcebook, I felt the utmost overwhelming desire to dive into the universe - to play and run its games. To absorb every rule and every nuance of the gameplay. Every time I tried to play Dark Heresy (and on other occasions, Rogue Trader), the campaigns felt flat. There was almost never a GM capable of meeting the standard of richness set by the book. Every session was bogged down by half an hour of searching for rules (and there is no reasonable way to summarise Dark Heresy's rules). I had never seen a universe so rich, and a ruleset so wretchedly bloated.

Wrath & Glory is the opposite by design, and in my play experience. W&G is by design, very shallow and very wide. Some would understandably make the same criticism for as Skyrim: a game with an ocean's width, and the depth of a puddle. This ignores that games like Skyrim are iconic in their field, and actually incredibly fun. W&G's in-house settings have never appealed to me. I have never once looked in its wargear lists and been enamoured with an item of gear or a relic. Yet the rules slipped on like a glove, from its more flawed first edition until now. In playing W&G, my groups have always been able to commit the main rules to memory, and make a reasonably sized quick-reference file for the other content. Having to trawl the rulebook for an obscure rule is fairly uncommon with this system. When I picked up Wrath & Glory and read it for the first time, I felt none of the burning desire to immerse myself the way Rogue Trader made me want to. Nothing even close. But unlike any of those previous systems, my group of newcomers and 40K lore buffs all got together and finished a long campaign. And we actually played the game successfully. That is the system's greatest success, and one I build my rating on. I can play Wrath & Glory, and it's not a chore. I can play it, and it's enjoyable. I can flesh it out with mountains of homebrew and not fear for conflict and bloat.

The comparisons between W&G and the entire Dark Heresy library are frankly unfair. Comparing a first-release core rulebook to a nearly decade-long franchise spanning dozens of works that had a completely different design philosophy is patently absurd. W&G, like Dark Heresy, needs to be evaluated on its own merits as much as its own drawbacks. The result is that I see W&G for what it was meant to be: a contemporary introduction to 40K roleplay suitable for new and old people. One that is not gated behind the elitism, expense and complexity of Dark Heresy, but one that consequently lacks fleshing-out.

The core mechanic for W&G is simple, adaptable and has built-in nuance for catastrophic and exceptional results. It is a generally stable and useful core mechanic using pooled D6 and I find it excellent. It does suffer from scaling issues when tests or skills become too high, and it is very difficulty to accurately estimate percentage changes for your success, unlike D20 or D100 systems.

Lore wise? My group are consummate homebrewers. We did not play with the pre-packaged lore for this one just like all the Dark Heresy and Rogue Trader source materials. I read those works for entertainment and inspiration, not to build a campaign over. From what I read of this book's lore, it is basic and covers the essentials, but it suffers from the shortcoming of having to place too many species into too-small a setting, and suffers from a lack of depth.

The lack of content with regards to wargear, narrative impact and playable characters is the book's greatest limitation. The book is packaged for four distinct factions (Orks, Eldar, Imperial, Chaos) right out of the box. But you can only play a very limited and small version of all of those factions except for the Imperium (unsurprisingly). Even the Imperial selection of wargear is pedestrian and basic by Warhammer 40 000's standards, with none of the eye-popping innovation and complexity previous systems featured. The gear and character archetypes require future content support, or heavy GM homebrew to reach their potential. Yet like every other part of the system, the framework for designing your own equipment and archetypes are simple and straightforward.

Cubicle7's changes in formatting, talents, ascension packages and... spelling are generally positive. I have no areas to report where the earliest edition was clearly superior to this edition and I write this on the release of its 2.1 Errata, adding new corrections and adjustments. I do note the removal of vehicle combat and voidship combat rules from the previous edition. I respect Ulisses' attempt for bringing iconic voidship combat into this system, but the attempt to bring such a complex and rich set of rules to a streamlined system was unsuccessful. The original implementation of vehicle and voidship combat were some of my greatest criticisms and Cubicle7 has seemingly removed them outright. Sadly, I think the removal of this content improved the average quality of the work, but it is notable.

And so:

Good

++Superbly simple and adaptable ruleset

++Highly playable

+Much better organised than previous edition, may Ulisses North America do well for the work they put in

+An excellent base for future content additions

Bad --Very shallow on its own story, gear and lore, requiring copious future content updates or copious homebrew

-Depth of rules was sacrificed in favour of flexibility and playability

-Removal of the vehicle combat rules, even if they were hideously flawed

A 4/5 in my eyes, if you want to play a 40K RPG. A 5/5 if you have a GM willing to do the copious homebrew needed to flesh it out. And a 5/5 one day, if it receives the content support it deserves.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Craig B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/29/2020 12:08:32

Although I like these rules, they are currently going through a revision. Once complete, it may warrent a 5 star raiting and more detailed review.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Marcus M. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/06/2020 23:42:28

For 10,000 years, endless war has engulfed the galaxy. From the decimated ruin of Cadia to the war-ravaged battlefields of Armageddon, and from the Hive cities of Necromunda to the Aeldari craftworld Iyanden, a billion billion souls have been lost to the eternal conflict.

In Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Wrath & Glory from Cubicle 7, you will be taking on the role of one of the pitiful souls who inhabit this universe, one where the fascist cultic dictatorship of the Imperium comes into conflict with servants of the dark gods, mindless war-hungry orks, mindless Necron automatons, or a littany of other alien races just as horrible. 40k is a world where there are no good sides. Everyone is despicable in their own special and unique way.

The previous version of 40k roleplay by Fantasy Flight was broken down into multiple books depending on what flavor of 40k you were interested in, separating Imperial Guard from Space Marines from Inquisition, and only allowing you to play as either a member of the Imperium or, in the case of Black Crusade, the forces of Chaos fighting the Imperium. In Wrath & Glory, the rules cover all of those, as well as playing as the Aeldari and Orks.

Let’s take a look at the rules.

Every campaign begins with a framework. This is essentially a group template, where the table decides what they want to play as in the universe. Do you want to all be Imperial Inquisitors? Hive gangers? A squad of Aeldari rangers lost on a planet at the edge of the galaxy? It’s important to set up the group’s framework, so you don’t end up in a game with a Space Marine, an Aeldari Howling Banshee, and an Ork Loota with no explanation as to why they’re all in the same party. In addition, because your stats are determined by spending XP, you’ll choose whether the characters will be Tier 1 through 4, which will give you different amounts of XP to spend at character creation. If you really wanna play as a Space Marine, you can do so, but you’re unlikely to be playing alongside an Inquisitorial Acolyte or Ministorum Priest. Here, more than in most RPGs, setting the expectation for the campaign is very important.

Whereas the FFG rules utilized a percentile system assembled from the WHFRP and Inquisitor rulesets, the ruleset here is the same as C7’s Age of Sigmar Roleplay: Soulbound. You roll a pool of D6’s, trying to get a certain number of successes above the target number, with the difficulty of scoring each success determined by the complexity of the test.

Here, you have three stats that will fluctuate throughout the session. Wrath, Glory and Ruin.

When rolling your D6’s, one die should be a different size or color representing your Wrath. A 1 or 6 on the die can activate specific effects. When you roll a 6, add 1 Glory to the group’s total. In addition, a successful check that also contains a 6 on the Wrath die is a critical success. When you roll a 1 on the Wrath die, you now have a Complication. This is a modifier to the final result, making it a “yes, but,” or a “no, and,” depending on whether the overall check succeeded or failed.

Wrath Points represent your character’s inner rage, fire and wrath. You can spend these points to reroll dice, claim narrative control, and restore shock.

You’ll note that there… well, there doesn’t seem to be any relation between Wrath Points and Wrath Dice. I’m not sure why a different term wasn’t used, as it could be pretty confusing for players during the course of a game. I asked Cubicle 7, and they said it’s a holdover from the original system.

Glory is a group resource. Your party always begins with 0 Glory at the end of the session, and represents the group’s determination and grit. These points are spent to add dice to a pool, make criticals more severe, and increase damage. Glory is gained from rolling a 6 on your Wrath die, as mentioned above, or you can shift a die from your pool. This means that when you roll any other 6’s, you can choose to remove that die from the dice pool (presumably seeing you succeeded without that die) to gain Glory. You can also shift in order to gain info, speed up the process you’re rolling for, or improve the quality of the test.

Ruin is a resource that the GM gets to use against the players. Whenever the players fail a fear or corruption test, or the GM rolls a 6 on their Wrath, Ruin rises. The GM can use it to reroll failures, or activate special Ruin actions that powerful enemies possess.

Psychic powers work how they do in most 40k games, in that failure causes horrible Perils of the Warp, strange happenings that make things very interesting. An optional rule exists that lower-level NPC Psykers and any bystanders fail any checks from Perils of the Warp, meaning horrific things happen around Psykers, making them always strange, wierd and dangerous.

The star system detailed in W&G continues the traditions of Calixis Sector (detailed in Dark Heresy), Scarus Sector (detailed in Eisenhorn), and Caligari Sector (detailed in Inquisitor – Martyr). It’s a new region given great detail. In this case, it’s a VERY busy solar system with multiple worlds of various types. With the terrible perils found in warp travel, you likely won’t want to leave the system, so it’s nice to see that you could easily run multiple campaigns here. There are Space Hulks, two bizzare worlds known as the Membrane Worlds, Hive Worlds, and Shrine Worlds. There’s a lot to see, and a lot to invent on your own.

This game is fantastic. It’s a really dynamic system that’s definitely set up to make the players feel like the anti-heroes everyone in 40k is, while still keeping the pressure on them and making them feel like they’re always one step away from destruction. If you’re a 40k player, I definitely recommend it, and if you aren’t, embrace the dark far future. It’s a terrible place, but it’s OUR terrible place.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Marcelo S S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/27/2020 17:22:57

Overall, it looks pretty cool, and, for beginers, either in RPG or in Warhammer40K, this should be amazing, however, I believe it does need suplements to achieve it's tru potential. Adeptus Astartes marines, for example, have a single class, and though the game recomends you customize it for SM specific games, so you can have Assault Squads, Tactical Squads, Devastator Squads etc, you would need to create such systems yourself. I believe it is a fair trade off considering you can play pretty much any kind of campaing with this system, customize a few classes for more in-focus campaings (Space Marines only, for example) doesn't sound like a problem to me, but, given it's competition is Death Watch, Rogue Trader, Dark Heresy etc, I believe this game would do well to release supplements for this kind of more focused games.

It DOES say in character creation that future supplements may bring new classes (even new races, given only humans, orks and eldars are presented in the book), but so said the previous edition also, and that one released 2 pre made missions and died out. The second edition is published under a new company (well, cubicle 7 isn't new, but it wasn't the publisher of first edition), and I hope this will lunch off this time, but it does need suplements to reach it's true potential. Or, you know, you can play a few games, get the felling for it, and make your own custom Tau, Necrons, Tyranids etc.

Buying this game you get both 1st (Legacy Files) and 2nd (all the rest) editions, so you can also compare each other and use whichever rules you find best. I'm certainly mixing a few things to better suit my taste.

ps: if they start releasing supplements later on, I'm increasing the rating, but since I believe it requires supplements and the previous publisher promissed, but did not delieve on it, I'm not giving the benefit of doubt this time.

ps2: I had bought the digital copy of the first edition last month (March 2020) in this site, and only later discovered a second edition was about to be released. I wasn't quite pleased with paying for something about to go obsolete (not angry, because I should have checked it before buying, but certainly not pleased). Yet, upon release of this edition, I got it's digital copy for free. This may have biased my rating, but hey... if the new publishers want to please the disapointed buyers of the previous publisher, I see that as a plus.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Cameron D. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/22/2020 19:48:25

I will be up front in saying that I am still working through the system, however I will say a couple points that I have already found raise this new version above the original Ulisses Spiele version of W&G - the main thing being size. This new Cubicle 7 version is almost eighty pages smaller than the original, already making it slimmer and less intimidating. Additionally, I prefer the layout to this version as it is easier to follow and manage as a reader. However, I think the biggest boost is that for me, this altogether makes Warhammer 40k more open to beginning players of both RPGs and the Imperium of Man; it is a lighter and easier-to-digest version of the original. Now, this is where my main critique of this newer version comes in, and that is where it feels like it skimps out on a lot of the art, lore, and 40k feel to make it more friendly. While I can see from a marketing standpoint how that would help, visually this new book just screams 40k Lite, while the original W&G exploded with FOR THE EMPORER! Overall, a mix of decent and meh; this new version gets props for ease of introduction and slimmed down form, but drops in that it seems to have pulled more of the Warhammer out.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by David W. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/19/2020 09:34:10

Firstly in response to the previous 1 star review - page 196 Shock healing rules under respite. Check out C7 social media where they have provided a reporting form to assist with editing prior to going to print.

I am massive fan of Cubicle 7 and loved the work they did on WHFRP and i am looking forward to the AOS Rpg.

It was always going to be tricky for C7 to pick up WG and improve it without overly changing the core game. I believe they have done a great job - the layout is great, writing is clear and the art stunning.

Character creation is straight forward and the rules provide for a robust 40k experiance.

The 40k setting is vast and the information provided gives enough for both experienced players and beginners alike in explaining the theme and tone of the game.

The Gilead system is a little dry but the comprehensive bestiary means you can draw upon the vast number of resources available to have fun and flesh out the system, play in other parts of the cannon or make up your own.

Have fun.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Łukasz G. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/19/2020 01:29:49

Wow. Cubicle 7 actually managed to turn an ok game with problems into a disaster. There are tons of editing errors, no pressing mechanical issues were fixed, the vehicle and starship rules got removed, there are even basic mistakes like removal of shock healing during rests.

Plus the lore itself got streamlined into the most boring, grimdark incarnation of 40k. It's like some 4chan halfwit got to insert "15 hour life expectancy" meme into a real book



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by James B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/17/2020 22:34:09

This short placeholder review is for the updated version vs. the original version. The layout is better and some rules have been tweaked for what I believe is the better. It is generally easier to find what you are looking for and the contradictions and ambiguities in the old book seem to be mostly ironed out.

The most egregious misstep is the removal of vehicle and voidship rules, especially considering there are still vehicle focused skills and traits (White Scars and Evil Sunz for example).

EDIT: Threatening Tasks also seem to have been removed, but that system wasn't very well designed anyhow. It was basically an overly complicated and cumbersome skill challenge system that can be done much more elegently with a simple skill challenge homebrew.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Rory H. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/17/2020 19:31:04

A major improvement from the previous printing in terms of layout, and kudos must go to Cubicle 7 for releasing this update free of charge to previous purchases.

The game could still be expanded upon, but it lays a pretty good foundation with a D6 dicepool rules system that functions a little closer to miniatures game than the previous percentile systems did. It lacks a 'high concept', as occured with Dark Heresy, Rogue Trader and instead adopts a fully inclusive, 'choose your own framewirk' regarding campaign design. While some might find this lacks focus, others will be enthused by the opportunity of playing previously unavalable options, like Ork Clans for example.

Its a good product, although I do miss aspects of the percentile system, which creates a certain gritty tone, and for me, the main interest still lies with the fantasy version of Warhammer roleplay.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by A customer [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/16/2020 04:29:50

The editing is clearly not finished yet and several mechanics are just plain bad. This is akin to a beta product.

Here are some examples of these problems.

Mechanical editing issues examples:

First of all the influence test system for acquiring stuff is very vague and poorly explained with no proper example, they also have no solution on how to get multiple of the same thing in one acquisition roll. Secondly they contradict themselves in the explanation of how it actually works. They are both claiming that "Wealth is spent after the initial Infl uence test, not before." and have the steps "3. Spend Assets or Wealth" and "4. Make the Infl uence Test and apply Shifts", this may seem like a minute difference but in practice one of the statements means you may lose your wealth and get nothing.

They also type specifically at the ascension psyker class that they only get one psychic discipline (while they on the proper psykers type they get access to everything), but at another point in the book they fully contradict that by stating you only need the Psyker keyword to be a psyker. This not only makes that ascension path useless but effectively makes the best way to play a psyker not to pick any psyker archetype and just grab the keyword as you go along, since those archetypes are very overcosted.

Some other fun ones are that the minimum long jump distance for an average human (without rolling for it which can yield more distance) is 6m which is female Olympian tier, while a maxed out human without any augmentations can jump 16m before rolling. The flamer can target the ground under people and hit automatically if it hits the ground (not hard), then requires an action by the enemies to put the flames out or they will take constant damage no matter their armour, basically making it the best CC weapon in the game.

General editing issues examples:

For instance the Heretek archetype is listed as tier 3 in their table but as tier 2 on its page, on every single skill they have written examples that follow a different set of proposed difficulties than the book proposes in its introduction to the rules. The wildcard keyword is written in some places where it should be the any keyword (or the other way around hard to be sure what they want to go with). The PDF also has several issues for example the word "influence" where about half the instances need to be searched for as "infl uence" in order to be found, which can also be seen earlier in this post where I quote the book.

Mechanical rules issues examples:

  1. The game has both a static DR pool and a static(ish) damage system. This means for example that a regular Ork Boy is almost impervious to las gun fire, for example a regular hit can never do damage without any special abilities or glory being used. There is a reason that most games either roll for damage (DnD) or roll for Damage Reduction (Shadowrun).
  2. Sustaining any psyhic power increases the thresholds you need to succeed of everything by 2 (which is a lot in this game), while sometimes also dealing damage to you and having you roll if others damage you in order to lose concentration. Now this would all be well and good if the powers actually justified this but barely any of them do and in those cases the difficulty change has no impact on the spell anyways. The most ridiculous example of this is the sustained minor powers which absolutely do not justify this cost. It is also a problem for self buffs for example spells like "Living Lightning" that is similar to DnD:s haste (but here you only can cast it on yourself and does a lot of damage to you per round) making them completely useless.
  3. Awful balancing between different player archetypes and lack of basic starting gear, some classes flat out start without armour even on tier 2 or 3 with no ability to get any type of armour from anything else in character creation. Due to the previously mentioned problem with the damage system the players who start with weak guns and weak armour may find themselves in situations where the other players severely outclass them, even though both players made combat focused characters and picked combat focused archetypes.

There are however some good points to the book and some good improvements compared to other 40k rpg:s. But I don't think it is ever appropriate to recommend such a poorly edited product until they fix at least some of it.

Edit: There was an update, but don't worry they fixed none of the issues I listed here.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by chris w. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/13/2019 11:47:47

Pretty disappointing to be honest. Feels like half a game cobbled together by someone with a passing familiarity with 40k lore. Massive chunks of the rules and character options don't make sense in terms of the lore and what is missing from the book is far more glaring than what is there. There will doubtless be many expansions to fill in the gaping holes.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by erik h. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/24/2019 05:16:27

Started a new campaign with this system and my group loves it!

Easy to adjust to your own playstyle and rules that are a good balance between fast flowing and crunch.

I can't wait until we get more material to work with! That said, the format is easy enough to make your own talents, weapons, cybernetics etc.

Only downside to me seems to be general editing issues, like some unclear phrasing, or inconsistencies with terminology for some rules or that some rules can be hard to find. But my group and I playtest anything we find unclear and go with whatever result we like best, so it's not anything major.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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