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Wrath & Glory: Core Rules $29.99
Average Rating:4.2 / 5
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Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
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Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Alex T. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/09/2019 17:00:02

Wrath&Glory has attempted to capture a huge range of 40k gameplay in one book and managed just that! You can play lots of archetypes from lowly imperial guardsman to deathwatch primaris captain! Inquisition, Hive Scum, Mechanicum, Chaos Cults, Eldar Corsairs and Orks - everything is playable straight from the book. There are even rules for Vehicles, Void Combat, Eldar Psychic Powers and Ork augmetics. To sum it up, Wrath&Glory captures a huge variaty in a starter book, which other systems would take years and 20 supplement books to achieve.

The game mechanic is interesting and combines typical hit&damage combat with some special twists. In particular, the precious Wrath Points can be used by players either to reroll all failed dice on an important roll (pure power-game), or to make a narrative declaration and changing the course of the story without rolling anything at all (pure roleplay). Since you gain Wrath Points mostly through good roleplaying, the system motivates you to stay in character, even if deep inside you are just after those juicy rerolls :)

The book covers the basics of post-Cadia 40k fluff, but does not offer a lot of depth in the setting. Instead, it offers you narrative hooks and ideas to base your campaign around, whatever your playstyle and group composition may be. I expect that expansions to this game will mostly focus on adding more story content for different character archetypes, rather than introducing lots of new rules.

P.S. Looking forward to the dark mechaincum book, if its ever gonna appear! :)



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Tobias N S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/21/2018 12:57:40

The game in on itself feels great, however from what i have discovered some tweaks to the combat might be nescessary depending on the usual preferences of a group. However i can't help but be baffled by the lack of support for the game. It feels really strange, and will probably be what kills it. I seem unable to purchace some of the physical elements of the book, such as campaign cards, crits, complications and so on. Nothing that isn't in the book, but it feels like i am being punished for not preordering the system instead of the preorderes being rewarded for buying early.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Malte R. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/31/2018 03:54:10

USNA managed to fit the huge scope of 40k into a single ruleset, which is quite a feat. Their approach enables you to play characters such as underhive scum or Ork Boys up to the glorious (Cchaos) Space Marines, Inquisitors and Rogue Traders. It leaves you with a freedom of choice in regards to the play-style that is fascinating (Eldar Corsairs or Chaos Heretics, anyone? You can play as such!). The rules are comprehensive and as a GM I have never managed large quantities of NPCs quiet as streamlined. The shifting mechanic gives the players a good ammount of influence on the outcome of their actions and USNA made sure that no skill feels obsolete. The combat is gritty but rewarding (and characters can make use of non-combat skills through "Interaction attacks" which influence the fight as well and add narrative moment).

Overall I like USNA's take on the 40k Universe, that is why I did not vote 2 stars.

But the rules suffer from poor editing, that leaves you pondering. There are a lot of mechanical inconsistencies that give the impression that at one point USNA decided to further streamline the rules but failed to check all the cross references for consistency. Which in turn ruins the whole streamlined ruleset like a deep road bump on a German highway. To me as a GM whose players appreciate my fair application of the rules and who do not like arbitrary rule interpretations, this can really ruin the flow. USNA are eager to clarify those rules problems in their forum, but I would rather not have to check a forum repeatedly and keep a stack of notes next to my rule book that are not story related.

So in the end, I feel like I purchased a (late) beta product and that is not what I ordered. I'll be happy to improve my rating when the PDF gets updated, but right now I can only recommend to buy the game with caution. I have hopes that since I have a PDF it will improve in the next months as it gets updated. But if I had bought the print version in the current state of the editing I'd return it immediately.

TL;DR: The scope and the approach is rewarding. Nevertheless, the rules are poorly edited and leave the impression that this is a beta product.

EDIT 31.10.2018: Our group enjoys the rules very much and in the past weeks(!) since I've written the review USNA has taken the input of the player base very seriously. Keep it up! :) Even though the PDF has not been updated yet, I feel inclined to improve the rating.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by A customer [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 09/12/2018 08:54:02

A very decent d6 pool system that is simple enough to start in but has enough complexity to justify sinking your teeth into. A lot of variety on player characters, and a lot of power to the GM to alter things on the fly with game mechanics (Ruin and Wrath). Many mechanics are simplified and left to the GM's discretion, like purchasing items or bionics. Although these can be aquired by players with BP (Build Points, which is used to buy attributes for example) at a higher cost so DM's that don't want to deal with making up rules can always default to that.

Not everything is good though. It's missing some editing problems. Influence used to aquireitems and using wealth has two rules as to how said wealth is spent (before or after check, which makes a pretty big difference). The way suppression fire works with one rule stating you can reduce the DN (Difficulty Number or DC) of the check by the weapon's Salvo rating, while other saying you can spend reloads up to Salvo times. Interaction Attacks, a way for RP characters to feel useful in combat are also poorly written as the DN for their checks are absurdly high on anything except the most basic of enemies, unless rolled. I think they wanted the checks to be Opposed, which would be balanced but as written the DN's are almost impossible.

The book could also use some structuring formatting as quite a bit of information is repeated and to create a character you have to swap around the book quite a bit.

Still looking forward to the future, I still think this is a great product, but does need a little iron out. As a DM I really like the freedom I get and almost all the problems can be fixed with a bit DM ruling. Can't wait to see expansions add new enemies and archetypes.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Robert C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/25/2018 14:39:57

I have played the FFG 40k games (Only War and after) extensively and I would say that overall, Wrath and Glory is a much needed improvement, however I will break down into specifics as to what I found good about the relase, and what I found bad.

PROS

  • System is more intuitive It's been much easier to explain to new players that you make a die pool, pick the successful die, and do cool stuff with the shifted die than it is to explain why it's a +10 this time but a +20 this other time, and how their talent plays into the situation. Also the biggest thing is the removal of the dodge skill, opting to instead give defense skills and items a bonus to a passive stat, or straight damage mitigation. It helps keep combat flowing as opposed to rolling to hit, then rolling to dodge, then counting out how many degrees of success, and on and on.

  • The depth is still there A lot of people complain that there is a loss of complexity given the expansion of the type of characters and themes that are covered in the system. (40k as a whole instead of just inquisitors, or rogue traders, etc etc). I would support this in the realm of fluff, but when it comes to player decisions effective combat scenarios, I think the system does it well in spades. You have plenty of combat actions that change your odds depending on positioning, movement, aiming, and terrain just like the previous iteration, along with new mechanics like interaction attacks and meta-resource management (wrath, glory, and ruin) that give players more control over how they respond to a scenario. The game is also less reliant on randomization, given the nature of dice pools, and damage is a fixed value with the oppertunity to add a more, as opposed to the old system of your lasgun can do anywhere from 3 to 12 damage.

  • Tons of options It always irked me that the FFG 40k systems provided very limited frameworks for playing xeno characters. Rogue Trader and Dark Heresy alone would give tons of oppertunities for players to be a xenos, but nothing ever came of it save an the old rogue trader guides. I like that right off the bat, you get a couple options for xenos and a framework on how they could be included in a campaign. It's personal preference, but I would rather have a game with a solid base game, with as many options and variants that are fleshed out in future splatbooks, than a game that focuses on a few specific things.

  • Less restrictive character building The biggest improvement, in my opinion, is the reduction of mechanics that focus on system mastery over player vision. FFG's Only War gameline introduced a concept called aptitudes, where specific character creation options would give you discounts to purchasing attributes, skills, and talents provided you met the criteria. While an interesting concept in theory, it ultimately resulted in players HAVING to choose some very specific backgrounds and classes in order to get the character to do what they want. This would lead to some very frustrating moments, such as a Master of Ordinance being very bad at actually calling in artillery strikes, or Commissars who could fight in combat without massive xp dumps. Archetypes offer interesting abilities that are unique, but at the same time, removing the old aptitude system has freed up players to build their characters the way they want to, without punishing them for playing outside the lines.

  • Tiers and ranks Tiers and ranks are a solid concept in gauging the scope and power-levels you want your players to be in, without resorting to xp adjustement. I think it's helpful to have the game advise you on what sort of missions, specific archetypes would most likely embark on.

CONS

  • Character creation error This is my biggest complaint and most frustrating issue with the book, and that is that there are several, important instances of rules inconsistencies in the book. The biggest one is between the Tier Character Creation Restrictions (Table 3-1) being completely inconsistent with the specific aptitude, talent, and special abilities restrictions on their respective sections. You will have no choice but to make an executive decision as a GM on which of the tables will be the one you go with (I personally went with the section specific tables). You also have issues that come up when making Ascended characters, in that if you run a game that stretches through multiple tiers, there is really no set up on how to ascend your character multiple times. (I personally just allow the player to respec and write it off as there was a long inbetween the increase of tiers). You may argue that the games were not intended to be played through multiple tiers, but if you look at their Dark Tides module, it does state you have the option of playing through the entire thing as the characters from the first story to the last.

  • Bland Talents Most the talents revolve around 'get x amount of die equal to your rank or 1/2 rank, in relation to doing thing'. I think it's a little too cookie cutter and not very interesting. With that being said, you have some interesting talents such as Fearless, Bombadier, and Devotees. I hope future books will inject some talents that allow players to do what they normally can't. Also, I think it's a little strange that talents, being so dependent on rank, will lead to strange situations where the same character at tier 1 rank 5, will recieve more bonus die than tier 3 rank 1. While die bonuses are limited by tier level, it still doesn't make sense to me thematically or mechanically (why or how could a higher tier character get less die than a lower tier character)

  • More Archetypes This gripe is a time-sensitive one, I'm sure that this will fade as more splats focusing on specific segments of the setting come out. While I appreciate the wide variety of options to play with, I did wish that there were more specific archetypes for given factions. Whether it was stormboys and eldar exiles, or even imperial guard medic vs ministorum doctor vs hospitaller vs space marine apothecary, giving different variants to all the factions would have made the game feel more fleshed out. Again, I will first hand admit this is a core rulebook, and it's more than reasonable to suggest that future books will cover this problem.

SUMMARY If they just fix the first issue listed I would upgrade my rating to a 4/5 instantly. All in all, I have great expectations for this series, and Ross has really exceeded expectations from a doubter like me.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Anthony D. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/22/2018 20:01:23

You can find my full review of the game here. I gave it a 3.5/5 rating with full details within the review.

For an abbreviated version of that review:

Wrath and Glory is a much welcome addition to the Warhammer RPG line. This new version is a cleaner, user friendly, and much more approachable version of the RPG when compared to the previous line by Fantasy Flight Games.

This book succeeds in many ways that others did not. The mechanic is quick to pick up and easy to hack, using a simple d6 dice pool mechanic. Fans of the miniatures will be right at home here, while roleplayers will have both easy mechanics and a handful of narrative mechanics to utilize to make the game interesting. The game also utilizes a relatively simple point-buy mechanic for building and progressing your characters (although the tables can get a bit much), and the "level" mechanic is more of a guideline of power and less a hard cap.

Wrath and Glory also makes the setting much more approachable; we are given bite-sized bits of lore to get started, which are just enough to draw conclusions but not so lacking that you feel like you need to read thirty years of lore to play.

I'm also a huge fan of using the Imperium Nihilus as a setting. One of the most frustrating parts of the 40k Universe was the hard limit of not allowing different races to cross, and the setting for this game actually promotes it. You can have a game with a Space Marine Scout, an Ork Kommando, a Tempustus Scion, and an Eldar Corsair all working for a Rogue Trader, and not only is it promoted, but it's fitting for the setting.

Sadly, the game has it's failings. Outside of some concerns I have about layout and editing, I do think the game has some mechanical issues. Namely, Wrath and Glory hasn't decided what it wants to be. One set of rules makes the game feel like a theater of mind RPG with a heavy emphasis on utilizing of story elements, but a related rule that is necessary for this works best with a battle map and miniatures (in this example: grenades and splash damage). There are also a few point in this book that a resource that should be completely optional (the Wrath Deck) becomes a mandatory element: "Threatening Tasks" (extended actions) requires the use of the Wrath Deck, and it is one of the rules that doesn't have a sidebar or alternative.

Overall, Wrath and Glory is a fun, fast-paced, and most importantly, accessible entry into the Warhammer 40k universe. It has everything you need to get started, but the game itself seems like it rides a line between a miniatures game with RPG elements, or an RPG with nods to miniature elements, and hasn't decided which way it will go. There are some things that are still missing, like more ships, specialized Astartes (no Librarians, Chaplains, or Apothecaries by the RAW), stats for Tau and Necrons, and a number of other things, but it is a good start to a game line.

I gave it a 3.5/5, as it has a number of good things going for it, even though there is an identity crisis going on.

If you're a fan of the 40k Universe, like easy to grok and hack RPG mechanics, and have a ton of Warhammer miniatures you want to repurpose, then you really can't go wrong with Wrath and Glory. The game has a ton of potential that I hope it will live up to.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Gordon Q. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/19/2018 19:29:43

Fantastic book and ruleset. It's great to have a core rulebook that lets you roleplay any scenario you want in the WARHAMMER 40,000 setting. :)



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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